Emergency Preparedness Rule

what the rule does

the rule establishes national emergency preparedness standards for medicare and medicaid participating healthcare providers and suppliers

The CMS Emergency Preparedness Rule is Adds A Stick to the Healthcare Preparedness Equation

the rule brings the stick into play

The CMS Emergency Preparedness Rule establishes national emergency preparedness requirements for Medicare- and Medicaid-participating providers and suppliers to plan for both natural and man-made disasters, and coordinate with federal, state, tribal, regional, and local emergency preparedness systems. Unlike preparedness 'carrots' offered through the Hospital Preparedness Program, the Rule is a stick that puts Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement at risk.

 

 

the rule applies to six inpatient provider and supplier types

seventeen provider and supplier types that are classified as either inpatient or outpatient

CMS inpatient Provider Types Image

the rule applies to eleven outpatient provider and supplier types

seventeen provider and supplier types that are classified as either inpatient or outpatient

CMS outpatient Provider Types Image

when and how the rule will be enforced

the rule took effect 11/15/2016 and must be implemented by 11/15/2017

CMS Emergency Preparedness Rule Implementation Schedule

implementation date

The Emergency Preparedness CoPs/CfCs must be implemented by all providers and suppliers by November 15, 2017. So what does that mean? Well, the implementation date is the date that State Survey Agencies (SA), Accreditation Organizations (AOs), and CMS Regional Offices (ROs) will begin assessing for compliance with the Emergency Preparedness CoPs/CfCs. CMS has stated that they hope to have interpretive guidance to the states sometime in the Spring of 2017. No extensions will be issued, so giddy-up.

CMS Emergency Preparedness Rule Implementation Schedule

how the rule's enforced

The Emergency Preparedness CoPs/CfCs are enforced through the Survey and Certification Process (SA) carried out by the either the SA, AO, ROs. Surveys are performed no less than every three years. Surveys may be required between those regularly scheduled when a complaint is received or CMS requests a verification survey be done to confirm that a survey done by an AO met quality standards. CMS may terminate an agreement with a provider of services if it is determined that the provider:

  • Is not complying substantially with the terms of the agreement, the provisions of title XVIII of the Social Security Act, or regulations promulgated thereunder;
  • Has failed to supply information necessary to determine whether payments are or were due and the amounts of such payments;
  • Refuses to permit examination of fiscal and other records (including medical records) necessary for the verification of information furnished as a basis for claiming payment under the Medicare program; or
  • Refuses to permit photocopying of any records or other information necessary to determine or verify compliance with participation requirements.

emergency preparedness rule video

the missouri hospital association emergency preparedness rule videos that explain the rule top to bottom

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CMS Emergency Preparedness Rule References 3 NFPA Standards